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The Best Work Comes From Complete Creative Freedom

22 Jul

tied handsEntrepreneurs, freelancers and contractors need to maintain some sense of creative freedom to do their job well. In fact, I feel confident enough to expand this statement to apply to every career field out there. Creativity is the lifeblood for employees at all levels. It’s what allows us to enjoy our job, maintain a feeling of control and build a vested interest in our work – but it’s not always granted freely. Whether it’s a controlling boss, a particular client or a company culture that demands you color inside the lines, sometimes our hands are unfortunately tied and creative freedom is stifled.

As a client or customer, coming to a business with your own non-negotiable plan in mind is the same as taking the pen out of an artist’s hand. Take for example an architect versus a drafter. An architect is more often hired for his artistic eye and ability to bring new and innovative ideas to the table. This is who you want to work with when you want someone else to direct the vision for a project. A drafter on the other hand is most often hired to outline the logistics of a pre-existing plan. This is who you want to work with when you already have a firm idea in mind and simply want someone else to bring it to fruition. Reasonably, less creative work is needed or expected from the drafter. You pay more for the architect, and understandably so.

The important point I want to communicate is that if you’re paying the extra money for the “architect,” don’t treat them like a drafter. Allow them the creative freedom they need to provide you with their full scope of expertise. And to fully do so you’ll want to closely consider following these next three steps:

 First, agree on your most important objective.

A client and a contractor foremost need to communicate the objectives of a project clearly. If they don’t first start on the same page, they have no chance of ending on the same page and a lot of time and talent will be wasted as a result. I advocate for using something like a “creative template” that can be a simple one-page sheet designed to capture a client’s most important thoughts on a project. Whether it’s creating a company training video, billboard ad or blueprint for a house, both the client and contractor should be able to clearly tell you what it is they’re trying to achieve. They must have a firm grasp on the objective.

Second, provide no more than three “must-haves.”

We will all be clients at one point or another, so it’s important that we learn how to be good ones! Such skills will also help us to get exactly what we want, while allowing the contractors and freelancers we hire to do their job with complete creative freedom. I’ve found that having no more than three “must-haves” as part of your expectations allows you to still feel in control without overhauling the project. Along with an identified objective, your short list of “must-haves” allows you to specify colors, content or style that’s important to you. Contractors have expertise and vision, but they don’t have the ability to read minds. Knowing what’s most important to you provides just enough direction. Think of your “must-haves” as the non-negotiables you want out of a significant other. So long as these criteria are met, everything else should be at least open for discussion.

Third, relinquish control!

Now that you’ve established an overarching objective and a short list of “must-haves” for a project, the only other limitations should be the sky. From a freelancer/contractor’s perspective, having to meet just 4 specifications is a huge difference from having a laundry list of needs and wants spelled out for you. As the final step, the most important thing a client can do is to relinquish control. And the most important thing a contractor can do is to satisfy the objective and must-haves and then strategically choose all other projects details with that particular client in mind. Knock their socks off by giving them everything they never knew they wanted!

 One final thought…

At the end of the day, all business owners must sign their names to whatever finished product they produce. If you take away creative freedom, this no longer remains an accurate representation of a business’s quality of work. If you’re a business owner, you’ll likely agree that protecting your reputation and the type of work you put out there is just as important as giving a client the finished product they want. It’s a touchy balance to maintain – but a critical one nonetheless.

How do you seek creative freedom in your job or career field? Or maybe you can recall a specific time in which your creativity was stifled and a project suffered as a result. Share your thoughts and experiences by commenting below!

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9 responses to “The Best Work Comes From Complete Creative Freedom

  1. Beate

    July 22, 2013 at 7:51 am

    So true! Freedom is EVERYTHING. No freedom no progress in anything.

     
  2. jessicamjonas

    July 22, 2013 at 10:42 am

    I disagree! Some creative freedom is necessary, true, but I believe there’s a lot to be said for constraint. Rules about what must be included or avoided can push you past the easiest choice and help refine your focus. For example, it’s more constraining to say “write me a story in 1500 words or fewer containing the words ‘lighthouse,’ ‘doorstep,’ and ‘liliputian'” or even “write me a poem that doesn’t use the letter ‘e'”, but it might be a more creatively exciting demand than “write something for me.”

     
    • Stephanie Shirley

      July 22, 2013 at 1:17 pm

      Great viewpoint as well – I agree that constraints make you think more creatively to still produce what the client is asking for within their specifications. But this becomes problematic if what they’re asking for isn’t the best strategy for their business. The fine balance is being specific in your requests, but also being receptive to the expertise of the person you hired to do the work.

       
      • jessicamjonas

        July 22, 2013 at 2:03 pm

        That makes a lot of sense. If you’re going to hire someone in a consulting capacity, being open-minded is kind of the point!

         
  3. devonsmiley

    July 23, 2013 at 9:17 pm

    This is right on – when people ask for your professional involvement, but then tell you exactly what to do, no one really benefits. With writing especially, I feel like some people just want a ‘drafter monkey’ rather than someone to actually take core ideas and develop them using insight and talent. Just hire a typist!

    Devon

     

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