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Life Lesson: Are You Satisfied or Merely Distracted?

25 Jan

Life Lesson Are You Satisfied or Merely Distracted

Thanks to technology and society telling us it’s normal and expected to be connected 24/7, we have found more ways than ever to live life distracted. We have become accustomed to consuming multiple forms of media at a time, so much so, that watching TV is often accompanied by surfing our phones for social media updates.

I am just as guilty as the rest of the world. I have caught myself checking my phone with one hand, answering an email with another hand and fooling myself into believe I’m still paying attention to the TV show playing in the background. During these moments in life, I feel productive, entertained and comfortable. But am I mistaking these feelings for happiness?

The question I pose today is this…amidst all of the distractions we use to take our attention off of feeling undesirable emotions like boredom, loneliness, doubt and sadness, are we skirting around the hard, but paramount task of seeking out true satisfaction in our lives?

A few weeks ago, I was listening to a thought-provoking lecture that cautioned us not to mistake satisfaction for distraction. By nature, we as humans have found countless ways to distract ourselves (i.e. procrastination) from the real task at hand, often because it’s more work. But we’re not fooling anyone. The repercussions of our distracted lives can be found all around us. How many “friends” do you have on Facebook versus how many friends you talk to (I mean real, meaningful conversations) on a weekly basis?

The blinking light of a social media update should not be valued higher than your family conversation around the dinner table. The distractions around us are tempting, and sometimes warranted, but for the most part they are futile attempts to fill a void that can only be filled by seeking true satisfaction – whatever that means to you.

The life lesson I want to share is this. We can continue down this slippery slope of distracting ourselves into believing we are satisfied in life, but we will always need to find more and better distractions to make us believe we are “happy.” Or we can start today by taking a closer look at our lives and the relationships that form our happiness. And the first step is to close our laptops during the evenings and weekends, turn off our phones when spending time with loved ones and seek satisfaction before distraction.

It’s a crazy, but simple notion – so simple that unless these two words were brought my attention in stark comparison, I might never have considered how satisfaction could be mistaken for distraction (and vice versa). It really makes me think about my intentions when I’m tempted to pick up my phone at dinner or check my email during family time. If I’m desiring the feeling of distraction, maybe there’s a void I need to fill first and foremost with true satisfaction that is far more lasting.

Take a constructive look at your own happiness. Would you say you are truly satisfied or merely distracted? If you feel compelled to share your insights, I’d love to hear your personal response to this deep question!

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4 Comments

Posted by on January 25, 2016 in Life

 

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4 responses to “Life Lesson: Are You Satisfied or Merely Distracted?

  1. ramakrishnan6002

    February 1, 2016 at 3:15 am

    Reblogged this on Gr8fullsoul.

     
  2. Kylee Carbone

    January 10, 2017 at 1:00 pm

    Eliminating distractions is one of my goals for this year. So far, one of my favorite articles I’ve read explains how technology has turned into a distraction instead of a resource. You may find it interesting: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-technology-hijacks-people-s-minds-from-a-magician-and-google-s-design-ethicist-1300144185

     
    • Stephanie Shirley

      January 10, 2017 at 1:35 pm

      Thank you for the comment, Kylee. That’s a great New Year’s goal and one I’m always working to achieve. Technology can absolutely be a distraction. While we often think of it “bridging the gap” I’ve come to find it can always create a divide.

       

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