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4 Reasons to Keep an Updated Resume – Even When You’re Not Looking for a Job

4 Reasons to Keep an Updated Resume

If you’ve been settled into your current job, even for just a year, it may be time to revisit and update your resume. You might be thinking “Why would I spend my time on that? I enjoy my job and have no plans to leave anytime soon.” Unfortunately, our economy and personal situations are equally hard to predict and either could land you unexpectedly unemployed or with the immediate need to find another job.

By keeping an updated resume, you won’t be overwhelmed by the task of updating it with a decade or more of new work experience, or worse yet, creating a completely new one from scratch. This is a major time savings when time is of the essence!

Simply put, the power of keeping a polished resume throughout your career can be more valuable than you think. Take a look at these 4 reasons to keep an updated resume, even when you’re not looking for a job.

Resumes are used for more than just job hunting

Keep in mind that a resume serves far more purposes that just landing a new job. If you want to apply for an award, toss your hat in the ring to be a guest speaker or be considered for a promotion within your current position, an updated resume may be required. By keeping an updated resume, you’re that much more prepared to jump on these opportunities as they arise.

It helps you see areas that might need strengthening

Could some continuing education or an industry certification help give you more of an edge in your professional field? As you update your resume periodically, you can see areas that may need to be strengthened in order to keep up with your peers. As much as your resume is a snapshot of your past work experience and qualifications, it can also serve as a road map to your future professional goals. If you take the time to review it frequently, you will see the potholes that need a little filling.

You may not be looking for a job, but a job could be looking for you

Headhunters and hiring managers might see your qualifications (like on social media platforms such as Linkedin) and approach you about a job opportunity. By keeping your resume updated, you’ll be able to quickly act on such an offer without hesitation. This is all the more reason to also keep your Linkedin profile updated along with your printed resume. They duplicate essentially the same information, so it’s hardly any additional work, especially considering the potential gain from doing so.

If and when you start a new job search, you’ll be glad you kept up with it

Updating a resume that is twenty years old is far more overwhelming than one that is updated every year. Plus, think about all the details that are sure to get lost over time. Can you recall all of the responsibilities and achievements from your first job from memory? Not likely. If you commit to capturing this information on a yearly basis, your resume will stay up to date and comprehensive of all the amazing things you have accomplished in your career thus far. Best of all, whenever you find yourself in need of a resume, it will be as simple as pulling up the file and glancing over it for a quick review rather than blowing off a pile of dust and trying to recall details of your job from several decades prior. Your future self cannot thank you enough for this!

When’s the last time you took a critical look at your resume? Share whether you do or do not have an updated resume and why by commenting below!

 
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Posted by on July 25, 2016 in Business & Success

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Instagram

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Instagram

Instagram is an important social media platform that some businesses mistakenly overlook. But the visual storytelling power of Instagram in today’s marketing world is undeniable! Once you create an Instagram account for your business, it is critical that you understand the platform’s basic etiquette to get the most out of the time you devote to building your brand through its use. Let’s take a look at five mistakes to avoid as a new business on Instagram.

Not establishing a unique hashtag and not using it consistently on all posts

First things first, when creating an Instagram account think about your brand and create a unique hashtag to represent you and your business.  After you have your business hashtag it is important to consistently use that tag when posting.  Don’t let one post go live without using your brands hashtag, as doing so is a missed opportunity to market your business.

Posting photos that lack quality or creativity
The last thing you want to do when posting to any social media site is to look unprofessional, so make sure the photos you choose to represent your brand are high quality and high resolution.  Equally as important as a photo’s quality is its creativity. Look for unique angels and interesting visuals that tell a story. This is your best bet that your followers, and potential customers, will stop scrolling long enough to learn more about your business. A good gallery of photos will also help to set you apart from your competitors and further enhance your brand value.

Not following other accounts related to your industry, product or service

Only posting to your account, aka the “hit and run” strategy, would be a vital mistake when using Instagram to grow your business. You need to also interact with other users and reciprocate some of the love! Search and follow other accounts that are related to your industry (it never hurts to keep your eyes on what competitors are doing) and accounts you simply find interesting. Surf relevant hashtags as a way to find people who are talking about topics related to your business. These other accounts will begin to build a network of followers in return and help you keep a pulse on emerging trends.

Ignoring comments and interactions you receive

As with any social media platform, it is important to stay up to date with your interactions on Instagram. Ignoring comments or not responding in timely manner will do nothing to help you build a following of happy customers. And for people just stumbling upon your account, a lack of feedback to your comments will make you appear inactive or disinterested. Commit to being just as present on Instagram as you are on Facebook, Twitter, etc. Check in at least daily, not only to post content but to respond to interactions as well.

Missing a call to action – how can people learn more or buy your product or service?

If you use Instagram merely to post pretty pictures, you’re missing the real value it can add to your business. Every marketing tactic needs to have a purpose and a call to action; Instagram is no exception. Utilize your profile to include a link to your website or blog. Better yet, make it a link to a specific landing page that will take a customer directly to your most popular products or services. Because links are not “live” in the comments section on Instagram, it’s a real missed opportunity to not include a link in your profile. Also, be consistent with the call to action in your posts. Tell people to click on the link in your profile to learn more or to buy. Every post should relate back to your business or brand in some way. This doesn’t mean every post needs to focus on a hard sell, but your followers should be able to get a sense of what you represent by looking at just a few of your most recent photos!

How have you broken into social media marketing on Instagram for your business or brand? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Linkedin

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Linkedin

Linkedin is a valuable, professional networking tool for building your personal brand, which is ultimately a reflection on your business. Because your profile represents you as a person, it’s all the more important to know what mistakes to avoid so that you don’t risk putting anything but your best face forward. Take a look at these five mistakes and learn how to avoid making them with your own profile on Linkedin!

Not reaching out and actively building your network

With any social networking site, actively reaching out to build connections with other people is an important part of successfully growing the value of your network. Don’t make the mistake of creating an account only to forget to reach out to contacts you know or have an interest in getting to know. Growing your network is as simple as this: send an invitation to connect with at least one new contact a day. Another great way to engage contacts and build your personal brand is to commit to participating in group discussions a couple times a week. Simply comment or ask a question, anything to start a conversation!

Reaching out TOO far and building your network with anyone and everyone
Now that we’ve talked about the value of building your network, it’s important to keep in mind that you can take this piece of advice too far. Trying to connect with everyone and anyone that Linkedin suggests will result in a ton of “false” connections that carry no value and merely clutter your contact list. Think about your goals and purpose for your personal brand. Aim to connect with contacts that you genuinely know or that align with the vision or your brand. When you go to search your contacts, you’ll have a meaningful list of professionals that can truly be of help to you.

Leaving outdated or incomplete content on your profile

In a world where change is constant, you want to remember to also regularly update your profile information to keep it accurate and relevant.  Whether your business moves to a new location or broadens its scope of service, it’s important to reflect these changes in your personal profile and on your business page on Linkedin.

Sharing your tweets or Facebook posts on Linkedin without formatting them specifically for this audience

Sharing the same content across all your social media accounts is problematic because each platform has its own features and limitations that call for a unique message. For example, Linkedin doesn’t limit you to 140 characters like Twitter, but it’s also not the best social media site for using hashtags. If you push your Twitter posts to Linkedin, it will be obvious you didn’t take the time to customize the content. Not only will this lose impact with your audience, it will also reflect that you’re not willing to put in the minimal extra time to customize your content in an effort to engage your contacts.

Not fully utilizing the power of long-form posts

The final, and possibly the biggest mistake people continue to make on Linkedin is not fully utilizing the power of long-form posts. You don’t have to have your own blog or be a skilled writer to publish meaningful content on Linkedin. In fact, this is a great way to get started! Rather than just sharing a link to your article or blog hosted on another website, you have the opportunity to increase the visibility of your content by publishing it directly to Linkedin. Your contacts can subscribe to your posts, comment on them and share with their network– all of which are powerful ways to increase your brand value, expertise and SEO.

What strategy have you used to build your Linkedin network and profile? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

No matter your business’s industry or specialty, a solid social media marketing strategy involving Twitter can produce positive and powerful outcomes. But in order to get the most out of using Twitter to build your brand, you need to know not only what to do, but also what not to do. Take a look at these 5 mistakes new businesses often make when using Twitter as part of their marketing strategy. 

Not sticking with one hashtag

Hashtags are one of the most powerful and efficient ways to share your information on Twitter; however, many businesses make the mistake of using multiple hashtags interchangeably instead of focusing their efforts on branding one.  Do your research! Choose a hashtag that isn’t already being used by another business and then use it consistently in your posts on social media and your marketing materials everywhere else. (Learn more about hashtag faux pas that should be avoided!)

Talking at their audience instead of listening and talking with them
When connecting with your audience through Twitter, you want to be sure your content comes across relatable and genuine. Don’t expect people to favorite, retweet or reply to a post if you don’t engage them. Remember the “What’s in it for me?” that people inherently want to find when reading content.  Post content that will spark a conversation rather than talking at them.  And when you do get a comment or share, be responsive! Aim to reply within the hour so that the conversation doesn’t go stale.

Letting their account sit stagnant

One of the biggest mistakes you can make on social media, especially with Twitter, is allowing your account to sit stagnant (i.e. going days or longer without posting fresh content). If you’re not interacting on a regular basis on Twitter, it sends the message that you’re not open for business or on top of your game. You wouldn’t open a new storefront and leave it sit vacant, right?  So when using your business Twitter account remember it’s a commitment to be present, reply, show interest, and interact!

Not formatting posts specifically for Twitter

What makes Twitter unique (and at times frustrating) is its limit of 140 characters per post. The intent is to encourage quick and concise sharing of information. For businesses using multiple social media platforms, this means you need to stop, think and format your posts specifically for Twitter as opposed to posting the same content you would on Facebook across every other social media site you use. Furthermore, you should be using hashtags and tagging fellow Twitter accounts, as appropriate, which is all the more reason to make your Twitter posts unique to this platform.

Being too “salesy” with Tweets

So often businesses think effective marketing is bombarding their audience with a hard sales pitch. While having a clear call to action is certainly a good thing, being too “salesy” will only turn off your customer base and cause your network to eventually tune you out completely. Instead, keep your brand top of mind and establish value by sharing helpful hints or information within your area of expertise. This will help you build both trust and a bigger following. The direct sales will result after you first put in the time to connect with your audience!

How have you navigated your small business strategy on Twitter? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

This week we begin a 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

Social media is a powerhouse of possibilities that offers businesses and brands unique and ever-changing ways to reach their target audience. It goes without saying that one of the most popular social media sites for businesses is Facebook. This platform is constantly updating its inner-workings to be more appealing, approachable and beneficial for businesses, but you still have to have a basic understanding of Facebook’s tools, and how they align with your marketing goals, to get the most out of your time and money.

As with any type of technology, there is a learning curve, especially for businesses who may not be “tech savvy.”  This is all the more reason to invest the time into learning the essential dos and don’ts businesses should follow when beginning to build a professional presence on Facebook. For example, when setting up your Facebook account, remember to make your page a business page and not a personal or group page.

And this just only scratches the surface. Here are 5 examples of mistakes you should avoid when using Facebook as a business marketing site!

Not staying consistent with the tone and style of your brand

When marketing your business, it is important to remember to stay consistent with the look and feel of your overall brand. This is especially true when creating the content you post on your Facebook business page – as this may be the first and only way new customers experience your brand.

The best way to ensure that you’re remaining consistent across all of your marketing efforts is to compare what you’re posting on social media with the look and feel of your website, email newsletters, print marketing materials as well as the personality, values, and mission you want your business to convey. Check for consistency just like you would proof read a letter before sending!

Getting way too long-winded with your content
We live in a society of content overload. That, combined with our tendency to merely skim content before moving on to the next thing is all the more reason to keep your Facebook posts short and sweet. Don’t confuse your Facebook business page with a blog, or worse, a novel. Give your audience the reader’s digest version and pique their interest to learn more.

Then, provide a call to action so they can indeed learn more! Don’t miss out on the opportunity to share a link back to your website or provide more information on how they can order a product. Your followers are flooded with endless content in their newsfeed. In order to grab their attention before they keep scrolling, you have to catch them with compelling, and easy to absorb content, otherwise they’re on to the next thing.

Not responding to comments or complaints

As true for any business, quality customer service should be your number one priority. Just as it is important to respond in a timely manner to phone or in-person complaints, you definitely want to frequently monitor the comments and messages that come in through your Facebook business page for issues that may arise. No matter how they choose to contact you, your customers deserve timely and truthful responses.

Furthermore, a complaint is not always a bad thing! When addressed properly, you have the opportunity to show your entire audience that you’re a caring and proactive company that puts its customers first. Also with using Facebook as a networking platform, you should be prepared to respond to all comments to your posts, including people who have questions or merely want to offer feedback, as these are just as important as complaints.

Posting only content without any images or visuals

A common mistake businesses make when marketing their brand on Facebook is posting only readable content. One of the best ways to grab attention quickly when people are scrolling through their feed is by adding visual content. Accompanying your text with relevant and catchy graphics is an easy and fool-proof way to engage your followers to actually pause and read your content.

Not fully filling out your “about” information on your business page

One of the most simple, yet easy to make mistakes when creating your Facebook business page is not being thorough when completing the “about” information section. It is crucial to be as detailed as possible in your explanation of your business for several reasons. First, your Facebook page may be many new customers first impression of your business. You should have all the essential information here to greet them, just as you would on your website. Additionally, the more content you provide, the better search results you’ll achieve. Don’t miss out on showing up in someone’s search when they’re potentially looking for a business that offers what you provide! The bottom line is that you want to make it easy for your followers to understand what your business offers and what your niche is.

How have you navigated your small business strategy on Facebook? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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Stop Using These 9 Metrics to Measure Success

Stop Using These 9 Metrics to Measure Success

Having worked with many, many different clients over the years, I’ve had the benefit of learning how they each run their business and how they quantify success.

As you might expect, this is as unique as a fingerprint. However, one thing I did find to be common among the happiest and healthiest businesses was that they did not focus their measure of success on any of the following nine metrics I will soon discuss. To say the least, these metrics are false and misleading. They also create an imbalanced company culture which can snow ball into bigger problems down the road.

Take a look at the nine metrics for success that we all need to stop using right now!

How long you spend completing a task

Imagine how long it would take most of us to change the oil in our car. Just because we devoted hours of (frustrating) labor to this task, doesn’t mean we were any more successful than a skilled mechanic who can complete this same job in a fraction of the time. How long someone spends completing a task is not an indicator of success.

How early or late you’re accessible by phone or email

Our culture tells us that the longer we work, the more important we must be. Checking emails and answering phone calls from sunrise to sunset makes us feel like we are more successful than our peers who cut out at (gasp!) 6pm and let emails wait until normal office hours resume the next day. How early or late we allow ourselves to be accessible for work tasks is not correlated to success, but it is most certainly correlated to a work-life imbalance.

The size of your office

One of the biggest mistakes I see small businesses make is investing in a large office space they simply don’t need. There’s no denying my support of a virtual work environment for its efficiency and cost-savings. Yet, so often new entrepreneurs feel that their success must be validated with a commercial office space that is one more thing to manage and one more bill to pay. The size of your office is not an indicator of success. Many high-profile business owners and CEOs throughout history have worked from their home, out of a basement or garage or voluntarily took the smallest office space in their building.

The size of your staff

Similar to the size of your office, the size of your staff doesn’t indicate success any more than the size of an SUV indicates the stature of the person driving it. All of these items can be obtained by people who are barely able to pay the bills each month – all for the perception of looking “bigger” than what they are. Work to keep your overhead as low as possible and instead focus on the size of your profit margins.

Fancy stationary

One of my biggest pet peeves is working with a client who claims to have a shoestring marketing budget, but who then pays an invoice with a slew of unnecessary collateral materials that were certainly not cheap. Custom-printed checks, stationary, envelopes and embossed business cards will not be what (solely) seals the deal with your client – a good communications strategy will. Don’t mistakenly use this as a metric for success and instead smartly invest your marketing dollars elsewhere.

The number of business cards you hand out

Speaking of business cards, loading up on thousands of these paper rectangles and then tossing them out like confetti at a networking function will not build meaningful relationships with fellow professionals and may actually make a bad first impression. Handing out hundreds of business cards a day (without any strategy or follow-up) is not a useful metric for success. Anyone can do that – including small children and robots.

The clutter in your inbox

Busyness does not equate to productivity and a cluttered inbox does not equate to success. Hundreds of unread emails may look impressive at first glance, but when the majority of these messages are spam, promotions and auto-responses, you are merely trying to convince yourself you’re important. I tend to treat my inbox like my to-do list. The few messages I leave there require my attention and usually receive it within a day. All other messages are read, discarded or filed into their appropriate sub folder. To someone else looking at my inbox, I may look like I’ve had a pretty easy day. But I’m okay with that because I know that this is not an indicator of success.

The number of meetings you attend

During my time spent working in government, I experienced just how much time can be wasted in meetings. People loved to schedule meetings and conference calls to basically fill their entire work day. This would then give them the need to stay late to actually accomplish anything, perpetuating this false measurement of success. The number of meetings you attend does not equate to a successful day or your level of importance within a company. In fact, the people who often have important work to do find any excuse to get out of these meetings and get back to their computers.

Social media likes, followers and interactions

Finally, and this one may shock you, the number of interactions you receive on social media is not an indicator of success. You may say, “Well then why are we told to spend so much time and money on establishing a social media presence to build our business?” I’m not discounting the effectiveness of a strategic social media plan as part of a larger marketing effort, but I am offering a friendly reminder that you and your business are worth far more than the number of likes you have on your fan page.

Likes can be easily bought and interactions can be skewed to the point where it’s hard to tell what, if any part of your sales are a direct result of someone following you on social media. Stop making this the focus of every sales and marketing meeting!

What should be our metrics for success?

…Quality and productivity!

There is one philosophy all businesses would benefit from embracing, and that’s simply to “Get it done…right!” Quality and productivity are the two metrics that we should use to measure the success of our day and the overall success of our business. Did we deliver quality work in a productive manner? The businesses that embody this philosophy and promote this culture to its employees are the ones that are thriving.

Did you knock everything off your to-do list by 3pm? Great, see you tomorrow! Do you need to spend a few extra hours perfecting a project you know your client will love? Maybe you work a little late tonight, but you know it will pay off in the end. Stop comparing hours, square-footage, email count and boxes of business cards. Instead, “Work hard in silence and let success make the noise.”

Which of these metrics do you most commonly see misused to measure success? Share the outcomes by commenting below!

 

 
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Posted by on November 9, 2015 in Business & Success

 

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