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7 Mistakes that Push Away New Business

7 Mistakes that Push Away New Business

When you’re fortunate to have new business come knocking at your door, it’s still far from a done deal. Winning over a client takes time, patience and strategy. In my industry, things always begin with an initial client phone call or an in-person meeting. This casual, first meeting is the opportunity for both parties to feel each other out. Do our visions and values align? Do we share realistic expectations for what can be accomplished with the given budget and time frame? Most importantly, is there chemistry? No, nothing romantic, just a good synergy that will help create a productive working relationship.

Even if all of these things appear to be on target, there are still quite a few ways in which I can push away this new business, if I’m not careful. While the ability to read a client and build a strong connection from the start isn’t something you can necessarily teach, there are a few obvious mistakes you should avoid when trying to win over a new client. Save yourself some future regret but taking note of the next seven items on this list!

  1. Being unresponsive

The first mistake you can make is to be anything but highly responsive to your prospective client. This is the first impression you make. If they call you to learn more about your services, respond to them same day. Even if you’re not able to connect by phone, the least you can do is email them to set up a time for a future phone call or meeting. Carry this level of responsiveness into every phase of working with this client. Chronically late responses are a red flag to the client that you may not be the easiest person work with.

  1. Acting like you have all the answers

In your first client meeting, don’t come in there like you have all the answers. You don’t. You’re meeting this client for the first time and you likely know little about the industry and nothing about their business (more than a website and social media can tell you). I know in my case, people call me in because there are serious internal problems taking place. This is something you can’t know simply by Googling them. Come ready to listen, take notes and ask questions.

  1. Lacking examples of your insight and experiences

While you don’t want to come in acting like you know everything about the client’s particular business, you do want to walk in ready to prove your knowledge and expertise. Offer plenty of examples of past client success stories that relate to the services you may provide to this new client. Real-world examples are not only powerful, they are memorable. Additionally, be prepared to offer some examples of new ideas you have, tailored to the client’s needs. Make them feel like you’re offering fresh solutions and not something canned that you provide to every client.

  1. Pushing a client toward a final decision in your first meeting

Let the first meeting be a no-pressure zone. If you do a good job selling yourself, there is no need to pressure a new client into making a final decision as to whether they want to work with you right then and there. In fact, it’s likely going to be in your favor to have them sleep on the ideas you presented and to get even more excited about them! Don’t be so desperate to close the deal that you end up closing the door on yourself.

  1. Leaving the first meeting with no action plan

Just because you’re not going to pressure the new client into a final decision doesn’t mean you can’t have a clear path for the next steps you will take toward that final decision. You need to leave the meeting with an action plan in place. If possible, leave with the ball in your court. That means it’s on you to get the client a proposal or follow-up with additional information to help them make a decision. This gives you the power to reach out to them on your terms, rather than waiting to hear back from the client.

  1. Not following-up

This loops back to mistake number one and the need to be responsive. Just as it’s important to be responsive, it’s equally important to initiate a response. Give the client some space after your first meeting and after you’ve provided them with a proposal and an outline of next steps. Then, about one week later (or if they specified how much time they need), follow-up! Keep it short and sincere. Ask them if they have any additional questions you can answer. Or if a new idea has come to you, share that with them – along with your enthusiasm for working with them soon. These techniques enable you to stay in touch without nagging them.

  1. Charging a new client for your business development time

Another mistake that pushes away new business is charging for things like your first consultation meeting, putting together a proposal or any other initial communications. If you’re properly vetting your leads, you should be closing just about every new client meeting you take. Your time spent in business development stands to yield far more profit in the long-run than the couple hundred dollars you may make charging your client for every interaction. Furthermore, the practice of nickel and diming a client is sure to make them question your business practices and possibly scare them off altogether. Do your homework, qualify your leads and then invest that initial time at no cost, knowing you have a great shot at making it back ten-fold!

Have you made any of these same mistakes and found that it pushed away new business? Or can you think of something else that is missing from this list? Share your ideas by leaving a comment below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Instagram

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Instagram

Instagram is an important social media platform that some businesses mistakenly overlook. But the visual storytelling power of Instagram in today’s marketing world is undeniable! Once you create an Instagram account for your business, it is critical that you understand the platform’s basic etiquette to get the most out of the time you devote to building your brand through its use. Let’s take a look at five mistakes to avoid as a new business on Instagram.

Not establishing a unique hashtag and not using it consistently on all posts

First things first, when creating an Instagram account think about your brand and create a unique hashtag to represent you and your business.  After you have your business hashtag it is important to consistently use that tag when posting.  Don’t let one post go live without using your brands hashtag, as doing so is a missed opportunity to market your business.

Posting photos that lack quality or creativity
The last thing you want to do when posting to any social media site is to look unprofessional, so make sure the photos you choose to represent your brand are high quality and high resolution.  Equally as important as a photo’s quality is its creativity. Look for unique angels and interesting visuals that tell a story. This is your best bet that your followers, and potential customers, will stop scrolling long enough to learn more about your business. A good gallery of photos will also help to set you apart from your competitors and further enhance your brand value.

Not following other accounts related to your industry, product or service

Only posting to your account, aka the “hit and run” strategy, would be a vital mistake when using Instagram to grow your business. You need to also interact with other users and reciprocate some of the love! Search and follow other accounts that are related to your industry (it never hurts to keep your eyes on what competitors are doing) and accounts you simply find interesting. Surf relevant hashtags as a way to find people who are talking about topics related to your business. These other accounts will begin to build a network of followers in return and help you keep a pulse on emerging trends.

Ignoring comments and interactions you receive

As with any social media platform, it is important to stay up to date with your interactions on Instagram. Ignoring comments or not responding in timely manner will do nothing to help you build a following of happy customers. And for people just stumbling upon your account, a lack of feedback to your comments will make you appear inactive or disinterested. Commit to being just as present on Instagram as you are on Facebook, Twitter, etc. Check in at least daily, not only to post content but to respond to interactions as well.

Missing a call to action – how can people learn more or buy your product or service?

If you use Instagram merely to post pretty pictures, you’re missing the real value it can add to your business. Every marketing tactic needs to have a purpose and a call to action; Instagram is no exception. Utilize your profile to include a link to your website or blog. Better yet, make it a link to a specific landing page that will take a customer directly to your most popular products or services. Because links are not “live” in the comments section on Instagram, it’s a real missed opportunity to not include a link in your profile. Also, be consistent with the call to action in your posts. Tell people to click on the link in your profile to learn more or to buy. Every post should relate back to your business or brand in some way. This doesn’t mean every post needs to focus on a hard sell, but your followers should be able to get a sense of what you represent by looking at just a few of your most recent photos!

How have you broken into social media marketing on Instagram for your business or brand? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Linkedin

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Linkedin

Linkedin is a valuable, professional networking tool for building your personal brand, which is ultimately a reflection on your business. Because your profile represents you as a person, it’s all the more important to know what mistakes to avoid so that you don’t risk putting anything but your best face forward. Take a look at these five mistakes and learn how to avoid making them with your own profile on Linkedin!

Not reaching out and actively building your network

With any social networking site, actively reaching out to build connections with other people is an important part of successfully growing the value of your network. Don’t make the mistake of creating an account only to forget to reach out to contacts you know or have an interest in getting to know. Growing your network is as simple as this: send an invitation to connect with at least one new contact a day. Another great way to engage contacts and build your personal brand is to commit to participating in group discussions a couple times a week. Simply comment or ask a question, anything to start a conversation!

Reaching out TOO far and building your network with anyone and everyone
Now that we’ve talked about the value of building your network, it’s important to keep in mind that you can take this piece of advice too far. Trying to connect with everyone and anyone that Linkedin suggests will result in a ton of “false” connections that carry no value and merely clutter your contact list. Think about your goals and purpose for your personal brand. Aim to connect with contacts that you genuinely know or that align with the vision or your brand. When you go to search your contacts, you’ll have a meaningful list of professionals that can truly be of help to you.

Leaving outdated or incomplete content on your profile

In a world where change is constant, you want to remember to also regularly update your profile information to keep it accurate and relevant.  Whether your business moves to a new location or broadens its scope of service, it’s important to reflect these changes in your personal profile and on your business page on Linkedin.

Sharing your tweets or Facebook posts on Linkedin without formatting them specifically for this audience

Sharing the same content across all your social media accounts is problematic because each platform has its own features and limitations that call for a unique message. For example, Linkedin doesn’t limit you to 140 characters like Twitter, but it’s also not the best social media site for using hashtags. If you push your Twitter posts to Linkedin, it will be obvious you didn’t take the time to customize the content. Not only will this lose impact with your audience, it will also reflect that you’re not willing to put in the minimal extra time to customize your content in an effort to engage your contacts.

Not fully utilizing the power of long-form posts

The final, and possibly the biggest mistake people continue to make on Linkedin is not fully utilizing the power of long-form posts. You don’t have to have your own blog or be a skilled writer to publish meaningful content on Linkedin. In fact, this is a great way to get started! Rather than just sharing a link to your article or blog hosted on another website, you have the opportunity to increase the visibility of your content by publishing it directly to Linkedin. Your contacts can subscribe to your posts, comment on them and share with their network– all of which are powerful ways to increase your brand value, expertise and SEO.

What strategy have you used to build your Linkedin network and profile? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

This week we continue our 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Twitter

No matter your business’s industry or specialty, a solid social media marketing strategy involving Twitter can produce positive and powerful outcomes. But in order to get the most out of using Twitter to build your brand, you need to know not only what to do, but also what not to do. Take a look at these 5 mistakes new businesses often make when using Twitter as part of their marketing strategy. 

Not sticking with one hashtag

Hashtags are one of the most powerful and efficient ways to share your information on Twitter; however, many businesses make the mistake of using multiple hashtags interchangeably instead of focusing their efforts on branding one.  Do your research! Choose a hashtag that isn’t already being used by another business and then use it consistently in your posts on social media and your marketing materials everywhere else. (Learn more about hashtag faux pas that should be avoided!)

Talking at their audience instead of listening and talking with them
When connecting with your audience through Twitter, you want to be sure your content comes across relatable and genuine. Don’t expect people to favorite, retweet or reply to a post if you don’t engage them. Remember the “What’s in it for me?” that people inherently want to find when reading content.  Post content that will spark a conversation rather than talking at them.  And when you do get a comment or share, be responsive! Aim to reply within the hour so that the conversation doesn’t go stale.

Letting their account sit stagnant

One of the biggest mistakes you can make on social media, especially with Twitter, is allowing your account to sit stagnant (i.e. going days or longer without posting fresh content). If you’re not interacting on a regular basis on Twitter, it sends the message that you’re not open for business or on top of your game. You wouldn’t open a new storefront and leave it sit vacant, right?  So when using your business Twitter account remember it’s a commitment to be present, reply, show interest, and interact!

Not formatting posts specifically for Twitter

What makes Twitter unique (and at times frustrating) is its limit of 140 characters per post. The intent is to encourage quick and concise sharing of information. For businesses using multiple social media platforms, this means you need to stop, think and format your posts specifically for Twitter as opposed to posting the same content you would on Facebook across every other social media site you use. Furthermore, you should be using hashtags and tagging fellow Twitter accounts, as appropriate, which is all the more reason to make your Twitter posts unique to this platform.

Being too “salesy” with Tweets

So often businesses think effective marketing is bombarding their audience with a hard sales pitch. While having a clear call to action is certainly a good thing, being too “salesy” will only turn off your customer base and cause your network to eventually tune you out completely. Instead, keep your brand top of mind and establish value by sharing helpful hints or information within your area of expertise. This will help you build both trust and a bigger following. The direct sales will result after you first put in the time to connect with your audience!

How have you navigated your small business strategy on Twitter? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

This week we begin a 4-week series in which we cover the top 5 mistakes business make on the most popular social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram. We invite you to subscribe and follow along each Monday for quick and valuable tips on how you can avoid making these mistakes and immediately improve your business’s social media presence. Enjoy!


5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

5 Mistakes New Businesses Make on Facebook

Social media is a powerhouse of possibilities that offers businesses and brands unique and ever-changing ways to reach their target audience. It goes without saying that one of the most popular social media sites for businesses is Facebook. This platform is constantly updating its inner-workings to be more appealing, approachable and beneficial for businesses, but you still have to have a basic understanding of Facebook’s tools, and how they align with your marketing goals, to get the most out of your time and money.

As with any type of technology, there is a learning curve, especially for businesses who may not be “tech savvy.”  This is all the more reason to invest the time into learning the essential dos and don’ts businesses should follow when beginning to build a professional presence on Facebook. For example, when setting up your Facebook account, remember to make your page a business page and not a personal or group page.

And this just only scratches the surface. Here are 5 examples of mistakes you should avoid when using Facebook as a business marketing site!

Not staying consistent with the tone and style of your brand

When marketing your business, it is important to remember to stay consistent with the look and feel of your overall brand. This is especially true when creating the content you post on your Facebook business page – as this may be the first and only way new customers experience your brand.

The best way to ensure that you’re remaining consistent across all of your marketing efforts is to compare what you’re posting on social media with the look and feel of your website, email newsletters, print marketing materials as well as the personality, values, and mission you want your business to convey. Check for consistency just like you would proof read a letter before sending!

Getting way too long-winded with your content
We live in a society of content overload. That, combined with our tendency to merely skim content before moving on to the next thing is all the more reason to keep your Facebook posts short and sweet. Don’t confuse your Facebook business page with a blog, or worse, a novel. Give your audience the reader’s digest version and pique their interest to learn more.

Then, provide a call to action so they can indeed learn more! Don’t miss out on the opportunity to share a link back to your website or provide more information on how they can order a product. Your followers are flooded with endless content in their newsfeed. In order to grab their attention before they keep scrolling, you have to catch them with compelling, and easy to absorb content, otherwise they’re on to the next thing.

Not responding to comments or complaints

As true for any business, quality customer service should be your number one priority. Just as it is important to respond in a timely manner to phone or in-person complaints, you definitely want to frequently monitor the comments and messages that come in through your Facebook business page for issues that may arise. No matter how they choose to contact you, your customers deserve timely and truthful responses.

Furthermore, a complaint is not always a bad thing! When addressed properly, you have the opportunity to show your entire audience that you’re a caring and proactive company that puts its customers first. Also with using Facebook as a networking platform, you should be prepared to respond to all comments to your posts, including people who have questions or merely want to offer feedback, as these are just as important as complaints.

Posting only content without any images or visuals

A common mistake businesses make when marketing their brand on Facebook is posting only readable content. One of the best ways to grab attention quickly when people are scrolling through their feed is by adding visual content. Accompanying your text with relevant and catchy graphics is an easy and fool-proof way to engage your followers to actually pause and read your content.

Not fully filling out your “about” information on your business page

One of the most simple, yet easy to make mistakes when creating your Facebook business page is not being thorough when completing the “about” information section. It is crucial to be as detailed as possible in your explanation of your business for several reasons. First, your Facebook page may be many new customers first impression of your business. You should have all the essential information here to greet them, just as you would on your website. Additionally, the more content you provide, the better search results you’ll achieve. Don’t miss out on showing up in someone’s search when they’re potentially looking for a business that offers what you provide! The bottom line is that you want to make it easy for your followers to understand what your business offers and what your niche is.

How have you navigated your small business strategy on Facebook? Have you made any of these mistakes? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 

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#YOUREDOINGITWRONG: 7 Common Hashtag Mistakes

hashtagabuse

It’s taken the social media world by storm and nearly every platform has found a way to make it relevant to the way people share and archive content. It’s the #hashtag. This crooked looking game of tic-tac-toe no longer means “number sign” in modern society. Rather, it’s better known as the powerful symbol that turns ordinary text into a hyperlinked portal to a galaxy of content shared around the world on that exact topic.

And just as we have with nearly every other aspect of social media, we have found quite a few ways to royally mess up the use of this tool. Here are seven common ways people are abusing the hashtag way more than they should.

1. It contains a spelling error

Hashtags are very specific. What you type in is what you get.  Unlike a Google search that will offer you a courteous suggestion of “Did you mean…?” hashtags don’t spell check, research or interpret what you type. By design, this is what allows every hashtag to be so unique and to represent exactly what you want to say. This also provides the perfect storm for spelling errors to render an otherwise powerful hashtag completely useless.

Let’s look an example. The very popular #iloveyou has more than 18 million posts on Instagram (at the time of writing this blog). Using this hashtag will get your picture seen by any of the millions of users who would stumble upon this mega-tag by the second. However, one slip of the thumb might cause you to tag #iloevyou which places your content in the ranks of just 45 other posts, earning you hardly any views. Proofread before publishing just as you would anything else! Never rely on auto-correct, which really seems to hate the formatting of hashtags.

This major hashtag fail may not be the direct result of a spelling error, but it is the result of someone not proofreading before publishing…and anticipating how awkwardly this phrase would read when smooshed into a hashtag.

hashtag fail

2. It is too long or too specific that there’s simply no chance anyone else will ever use (or see) it

Let’s take for example a hashtag like #icantwaitforkathysbirthdaypartyintoronto. I didn’t search it on Instagram, but I don’t feel like I have to. Hashtagging the alphabet backwards will have more posts than this. The example I gave is of a post that is both too long and too specific. Only in very isolated instances is hashtagging a whole sentence acceptable (or part of a good strategy). Instead, the post could have been written as “I can’t wait for #kathys27thbirthday in #Toronto!” Toronto is a far more powerful hashtag. And Kathy’s birthday-specific hashtag could become the designated tag for the party and where your whole group of friends collect photos in one place.

3. It is the “off version” of a more popular term

Holidays are among the biggest offenders of this common mistake. Let’s take for example the Fourth of July. Should you use #fourthofjuly or #4thofjuly or #july4th or #julyfourth or ditch the date and go with #independenceday? Don’t even venture down the path of throwing the year in there or your mind will explode with uncertainty!

The truth is none of these options are “wrong” per se. They were all used to tag posts related to the holiday and each earned some pretty hefty numbers. If your goal is to tag the fastest trending term, then do your research! Scan the different options and compare numbers. Another strategy is to simply go with what you like best, but make sure to be consistent and use this exact term across all your related posts.

4. It simply makes no sense

Sometimes it’s the result of a spelling error, sometimes it’s the result of not understanding hashtags and sometimes it’s the result of not understanding the English language. No matter the reason, if your hashtag makes absolutely no sense, you can bet that no one else (unless by sheer mistake) will choose to use this same tag and your post will never gain exposure beyond your own, isolated network. Again, do your research on whether your tag already exists, whether there’s a more trendy option and always proofread before publishing!

5. It is separated by spaces or apostrophes

For as much as I love to see grammatically correct social media posts, hashtags are one of the few times where you need to throw your spaces, commas, hyphens and apostrophes aside.  Here’s why. The hashtag #you’remybestfriend will be broken as soon as it hits the contraction. #You is a strong hashtag, but it’s missing the more relevant hashtag you’re really after here. In this case, you want to write #youremybestfriend, cringe and hit publish. Additionally, posting “# flowers are beautiful” won’t do anything – at all. Things need to get up close and personal for the hashtag to work. That’s right, the words will touch. Same goes for you hyphens and commas! Write #set-up as #setup and #this,thatandtheotherthing as #thisthatandtheotherthing.

6. It is one of 20+ hashtags you’re using in a single post

If the caption under your photo looks like a paragraph of blue links, you are drowning your followers in a sea of hashtags. Worse yet, you’re risking looking as spammy and desperate as those phishing emails from that Nigerian Prince who is still asking me to wire him large sums of money! More is not always better. There is a point of diminishing returns for hashtags. While this strategy will increase the different ways the social media platform shares your content, to us living, breathing humans it will simply look like you care more about being seen than what you’re really saying. Limit your hashtags to (gasp) 5-7 meaningful and relevant tags. We all thank you in advance.

7. It is used inconsistently

Using existing popular hashtags is a great way to promote your content to a broader, more public audience than your own social network. Another strategic way to use hashtags is to create your own as an organized landing spot for all of the content that relates back to your brand. Best of all, other people can contribute to this “file folder” of content by using the same hashtag. This is exactly what these platforms were intended to promote – a social and interactive online environment.

So where does it go wrong? When you use this hashtag inconsistently. Hashtags are, after all, a communications strategy. Just as you (hopefully) know you must remain consistent in your other marketing and public relations efforts, you must also remain consistent in using this phrase with every piece of relevant content you post. Make it a destination to which people want to travel – and stay a while. This requires quality content that is updated frequently.

Now that you’ve learned the most common ways people are abusing this powerful social media tool, I hope you’ll go out and utilize the almighty hashtag with confidence and creativity. #goodluck!

What are some of the most egregious mistakes you’ve seen when using hashtags? Share your funny (and helpful) examples by commenting below (pet peeves are welcome)!

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2014 in Business & Success, Social Media

 

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The Growing Gap Between Technology and Wisdom

dunce cap

Technology is both a blessing and a burden. It allows us to access people and information all across the globe and has facilitated countless opportunities that would never exist without its advancements. But this doesn’t come without setbacks. Technology is moving at an increasingly rapid pace, a pace that society is struggling to match. A quote from Isaac Asimov sums this thought up quite well, “The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.” This truth is only made more evident every time we see the misuse of social media or turn to a search engine to do the thinking for us. There’s a growing gap between technology and wisdom. Instead of embracing our ability to do more, we’re using it as a crutch to do less. Let’s take a look at a few trends that illustrate how technological advancements have come at the price of conventional wisdom.

Social Media Faux Pas

Spelling errors, outlandish or offensive statements and superficial thoughts are accepted without a bat of an eye on social media. Even if you keep your friend list to just close contacts, you’re still bound to see examples of these faux pas in your newsfeed on a daily basis. Social media has given each of us a soapbox and a megaphone, but not the common sense for how we should use it. The wisdom and better judgment we need to develop our “social media manners” is being outpaced by technology. As a result, we see daily examples of social media faux pas, some of which can be dangerous or hurtful. For the most part, social media is like the Wild West with no rules and infinite freedom. This is both a benefit and a pitfall. It will take time to develop the wisdom to utilize this technology with decorum, and it will also take our personal desire for higher standards. What can we do right now? Take careful consideration to what we share and how we share it. Use the same manners we would use when communicating through any other medium. It may be simple advice, but it’s not common sense – yet.

Lack of Common Knowledge

“I don’t know…Google it!” This is a phrase that’s echoed all across the globe. In fact, there’s a good chance it’s being said right now in multiple different languages. This is the easiest response to any question someone might ask of you. I don’t know if the bigger issue is that we don’t know the answers to so many simple questions or if we do but are just too lazy to retrieve them from memory. We can now type faster than we can think, and this is the ultimate problem. Search engines are right at our fingertips every hour of the day. Thanks to smart phones, they’re only ever as far as our pockets or purses.  I’m just as guilty as anyone else – if I want to know the capital of a state, convert feet to meters or check my spelling, I turn to Google. What did we ever do before? We committed information to memory. Search engines are fast, reliable and easy, but they’re not a replacement for actually learning the information they provide.

Communication Erosion

I’ve discussed before how technology can both bridge a gap and build a wall. It allows us more ways than ever to communicate and gives us instant access to people across the globe. But it also provides a shield that we can hide behind and has contributed to erosion in formal, face-to-face communication. When presented with all of our options, we usually choose email over phone calls and phone calls over in-person meetings. Throw social media into the mix, and Facebook messages and Tweets have become an even less formal way to get a hold of someone. This is a fine option for a quick message to a friend, but social media is not a replacement for sharing a project proposal or soliciting someone for their business. When it comes to sharing hard news or negative feedback, it’s even more tempting to hide behind technology.  Sending a generic Linkedin message to make an introduction or breaking up with someone over text may get the message across, but it won’t earn you any respect and won’t make you any (real) friends.

With all of the information we have at our fingertips, we are the “smartest” society yet. But in exchange, we have seemed to sacrifice our wisdom and ability to think critically for ourselves. Social media doesn’t spell check our egregious grammatical errors or review our half-baked thoughts, search engines have made us lazy and smart phones have made us dumb. These are the rock bottom standards that technology accepts from us, but we can demand better. Let’s aim a little higher. With awareness and commitment, we can maintain our wisdom even with rapid technological advancements. Let’s take an active role in growing our wisdom every day with the help of technology, not despite it.

In what ways have you seen the decline of conventional wisdom because of technology? Do you rely on search engines or smart phones to complete everyday tasks? Share your thoughts and add to the discussion by commenting below!

 
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Posted by on November 25, 2013 in Social Media, Technology

 

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