RSS

Tag Archives: Work

How to Be Prepared for Absolutely Anything in Life

Be prepared like Noah

This quote is a great reminder that preparation is never a waste of time or energy.

I have one very distinctive personality trait that I can remember possessing as far back as grade school, throughout college and I still exhibit it to this day. It’s that I love to be over prepared. So much so, that I sometimes plan for extreme scenarios (coming down with pneumonia, driving off with my laptop on the hood of my car, sustaining a small house fire) and get my ducks in a row early and often so that I wouldn’t miss a beat, personally and professionally, should any of this happen.

In school, I would begin and often complete a semester-long project during the first 2 months. I would spend the rest of that time working ahead on other coursework – or as I did my senior year – starting my own PR consulting business. I often had fellow classmates or roommates ask me why I would work ahead when I didn’t have to. My response was always something along the lines of “I’d rather know I have it done now than risk something coming up later and not being able to finish it in time.” Yes, I sounded like a nerd then (and I still sort of am), but this personality trait proved to be a very strategic time management technique that has served me well throughout my life.

For all those times that I prepared and worked ahead on something and never got sick, injured or had technology malfunction on me, I was rewarded with free time to use however I wished. Sometimes I would work on other projects and sometimes I would simply relax. I also graduated college in the top 2 percent of my class without ever having to pull and all-nighter (where’s my plaque for that?).

I still plan in advance and have developed quite a few time-saving hacks that allow me to set my own schedule, take unlimited vacation days and travel throughout the year. When I’m in the groove, I work hard. For example, I’m actually writing this blog on January 2nd – Happy New Year! And this published live while I was playing with my son.

Being prepared has helped me to look like a professional and serve my clients well. It’s one of the things I am most complimented on and I take it very seriously. So how do I manage to stay ahead of the curve balls life so often throws our way? Here are 4 tips I personally use to be prepared for absolutely anything in life.

  1. Train in all areas of life

During “crunch time” when I have many projects that all seem to need to be delivered on the exact same day, I’ve found mental toughness to be a great asset. A daunting to-do list can be paralyzing, but if you can push through this mental barrier and just start somewhere, anywhere, that is 80 percent of the battle. I’ve found my own mental toughness to be closely linked to my physical strength. This is why, in addition to being a passionate entrepreneur, I remain a dedicated athlete. Physical activity is a part of my daily routine and I prioritize it.

I’ve had people ask me, “What are you training for?” My response is always, “Life.” It’s true. I am always training for life and that includes physically, mentally and spiritually. If you are equally strong in all three of these areas, you will be better equipped to handle whatever life throws your way.

  1. Clear your bandwidth daily

I refer to my workload capacity as my “bandwidth” and I have found that I can accommodate far more tasks than I ever thought possible if I make a conscious effort to clear this bandwidth daily. I try and zero-out my task list each night so that I can start each day with a clean slate and a narrowed down list of true priorities. If I can do it now, I do. This technique has allowed me to jump on spur of the moment projects and other work opportunities that I would have had to pass up had I not had the clear bandwidth. It also greatly reduces the stress that comes with a full day’s work combined with emergency projects or unexpected setbacks like a sick kid.

  1. Be productive not “busy”

There is a difference between being productive and being busy. I’m sure you can think of at least one person you know who always gripes about being so “busy” yet you know there isn’t that much on their to-do list or that they waste time in various ways. Productive people accomplish just as much (often more) than a busy person in far less time. It’s the concept of working smarter, not harder.

When I get in the zone on a work project, I shut out all other distractions (no TV, muted phone, no social media, no other windows open on my computer) and accomplish the task in half the time it would take me if I was multitasking. Aim to be productive, not busy and you will be far more resilient when reacting to life’s curve balls.

  1. Celebrate when everything goes as planned!

Finally and most importantly, stop and enjoy the free time you’ve earned by being prepared. As I mentioned, I often use this time to work ahead on pet projects or relax with “me time.” It all depends upon my mood. Planning ahead is not meant to be a trap where you continue working endlessly, rather it’s about working efficiently and using the time this hard work has earned you to do other things you love!

Do you feel prepared for the obstacles that life throws at you or are you often blind-sided and left scrambling to pick up the pieces? Tell me how you prepare (or want to better prepare) yourself to handle life’s curve balls by commenting below!

 
10 Comments

Posted by on February 2, 2015 in Business & Success, Life

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to “Winterize” Your Business for a Slow Season

thermostat

Your slow season may require “turning down the heat” on your business but you can still remain comfortable and cozy with these 6 tips!

If you spent enough time with any business, you would be able to pick up on the regular ebb and flow of its seasons. I’m not talking about spring, summer, fall and winter, rather I’m talking about the natural cycle of busy and non-busy seasons that usually come at regular intervals from year to year.

For many businesses, this depends upon their industry. Some are seasonal for obvious reasons because they cater to a particular holiday or type of weather. But even businesses that offer the same services year-round will still experience periods of slower sales.

A slow season can be just as beneficial to your business as a busy season depending upon how you use your time and how proactive you are about preparing yourself to handle the difference in workload. Here are 6 ways to “winterize” your business for its slow season so that this drop in income won’t leave you out in the cold!

  1. Minimize overhead expenses

When you know your business is about to slow down for a few weeks or months, the first thing you should do is take a close look at where you’re spending money. There’s a good chance that during this slow season, you can also slow down some of your business expenses. For example, if you have freelance or contract employees, let them know that there may not be work for them in the coming months. Using contractors is a great way to remain flexible to the seasons of your business because you’re not responsible for consistent payroll like you are with employees.

Additionally, you should also cancel any subscriptions or accounts that you may not be using on the regular and are not locked into an annual contract. This could include email marketing or social media monitoring services you use for your clients among other things. One note of caution: if you also use these services for your own business development, you may want to hang on to the subscription and use it to build your business during this slow period. Dropping your account down to a lower level may also be an option.

  1. Be flexible with pricing

As a business owner, don’t ever forget the simple but essential law of supply and demand. To remain resilient during slow seasons, you need to remain flexible with the pricing of your services. For example, during your peak season you may be able to charge $125 per hour, but during your slow season when your time is not in as high of a demand, it makes sense to take on projects for a lesser hourly rate.

These discounted projects will still add up and help keep you in the black. Be sure and negotiate these rates for a limited period of time so that clients are aware that the prices will raise when you enter back into your busy season. Or try and scope these discounted projects so they wrap up prior to the end of your slow season.

  1. Focus on building your pipeline

Your business’s slow season is a valuable time to focus your attention back on building your pipeline of prospective clients. This may not earn you income immediately, but it will help set you up for future success. Make phone calls, send emails and put together proposals. Now is the time to invest in business development!

  1. Create a referral program

Since we’re talking about business development, your slow season is a great time to also launch a referral program to incentivize current clients and contacts to bring you warm leads. Your referral program can include a discount on your services to the person who referred you or a cut of the contract you sign into with their referral – maybe even a blend of both. Think about what makes the most sense for your business structure and then be sure to promote it to your networks!

  1. Tackle those business projects you put on the back burner

“Winterizing” your business is also a great opportunity to really dig into those corners and tackle business projects you’ve been putting off because you simply haven’t had the time. Now you do! This could include revamping your website and promotional materials, developing a better social media strategy or starting a blog. If business has really died down, make yourself your own client and focus on sprucing up all those odds and ends that have gone by the wayside when you’re swamped with work.

  1. Take advantage of the extra time to relax and rejuvenate!

If nothing else, your slow season is the ideal time to take a deep breath and focus on your own mental health. Maybe you take a vacation or simply enjoy more downtime at home. However you choose to spend your hours outside the office is up to you, but this could be a valuable opportunity to rebalance your personal and professional responsibilities. Most importantly, use this time to get fully recharged so that when your busy season hits again (and it will) you are ready and raring to go!

When does your business tend to hit a slow season? Share some of the ways in which you “winterize” your business to minimize overhead and focus on client building during these times.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 8, 2014 in Business & Success

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Have You Fallen Into the Deadly Trap of Time Management?

time trap

We devote so much time and energy to improving our time management. There are websites, blogs, educational programs and entire shelves in bookstores dedicated to this very topic. After all, time management is the “holy grail” of happiness and success, right? We think it’s what allows us to do it all and do it well, take on more projects, get that raise and provide for our family. But what I’ve recently come to find is that the entire concept of time management is one big lie.

Controlling time, by any means, is simply not possible. There are things we do to make ourselves feel like we are in control. These things, like waking up early, working faster, skipping lunch breaks and staying up late may insulate our happy little bubble of managed time, but there are no more hours in our day and everything comes at the sacrifice of something else.

Technology has only aggravated this problem by making us feel like we can be ever more efficient with our time by being hyper-connected and multitasking every hour of the day. We think that if we can get more done today, that tomorrow will be less hectic, that tomorrow we will have time for our hobbies, that tomorrow we will be less stressed and more happy. But tomorrow is a moving target and every day is just as busy as the one before because we simply aren’t able to manage time.

Don’t believe me? Here are a few of life’s truths that have helped me to recognize the deadly traps of time management:

We can’t manage time; we can only manage ourselves regarding time.

As I said before, time management is a lie. We can’t manage time; we can only manage ourselves regarding time. We aren’t in control of time, but we are in control of our actions. How we choose to use the time we’ve been given every day is the most critical decision we have to make with our lives.

Rather than missing the forest for the trees by worrying about how we can answer more emails in a day, worry about why we even want to be answering so many emails in a day. Look at the bigger picture of your life and begin to prioritize what will matter most in the grand meaning of your existence.

You don’t “have” to do anything.

Another one of time management’s deadly traps is overwhelming ourselves with everything we “have” to do in a day. When I looked back at my Google calendar from a year ago, it’s interesting to see everything I packed into my schedule and marked with a star as a “must do” task.

What would have happened if I simply didn’t get to it that day, that week, ever? Minor consequences, if any. I have to constantly resist creating additional and unnecessary pressure in my life. We all do. If you feel like there is so much you “have” to get done today that you can’t meet a friend for lunch or take off an hour early to see your son’s soccer game, closely evaluate these tasks again and you’ll be surprised as to how this new mindset will show you how things can – and will – wait.

You will never have more time.

No one is able to “make time,” they must prioritize. We all have the same number of seconds every day so when someone says they’ll try and make time for that tomorrow, you know that it’s simply not a priority.

Another trap is saying you will take on a task when you have more time. You will never have more time. You must either do less or do it faster to make room for something else in your life. Again, it comes down to priorities.

It will never take just a minute…half hour…hour.

This time management trap is one of the most subtle and therefore extremely sneaky. It’s being unrealistic with how long it will take you to complete a task. We begin our busy day with a task list orchestrated by the minute only to find that we are constantly falling behind and chronically late. Does this sound familiar? It’s likely because you think a task will take half the time that it actually requires and so you overbook your day and scramble to get back on track. This is a frustrating and stressful life to live.

Start tracking the time it takes you to do common tasks to gain a better sense for how much time they require. This will help you to manage yourself regarding time.

Only in very rare instances does something have to be done “now.”

This final time management trap is the one that really gets under my skin because it’s the result of someone else trying to manage your time for you. Your boss, co-worker or spouse asks you to do something and insists it has to be done right now. Does this sound familiar? We all know that person who feels like everything they have going on is urgent and you should drop everything you’re doing to make it a priority. Yet, once we do complete the task, they don’t even touch it until the next day, or week, or at all.

Don’t get caught up in someone else’s urgent trivialities. It’s a power game and their effort to control you since they likely feel out of control with other aspects of their life. Directly question if it truly is something urgent; make them justify it. Then, push back. Let them know you have other things going on and matter of factly state that it cannot be completed until next week. I always say that if everything is urgent, then nothing is urgent. Learn to identify those people who “cry wolf” with your time.

In the end…

What’s the moral of this life lesson? It’s that the time given to us each day and the number of days we’re given in our life is completely out of our control. We can continue to waste these precious moments trying to find time hacks and ways to cram even more into our days. Or we can stop living the lie of “time management” and starting actually living.

So how should we manage our time? We should take more naps, longer lunch breaks, a long walk and turn off work after reasonable business hours have passed. Yes, there will be tasks left to do, but there will always be tasks left to do. Even if you worked 24 hours a day, there would be something more to fill your time – or you would invent it. You are the only person who can and should prioritize your life. If you don’t work to find a balance, you will simply work and work and work until that becomes the only meaning in your life. And that is a very sad day, indeed.

So, have you fallen into the deadly trap of time management – working longer and harder in hopes that it will make tomorrow less hectic…but it never does? Share your own struggles and triumphs by commenting below!

 
5 Comments

Posted by on October 13, 2014 in Business & Success

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The 11 Most Annoying Email Personalities

annoying_email_habits

Proper email etiquette is an acquired skill and one we must actively work to maintain. Communicating with someone who lacks this etiquette can be one of the most frustrating experiences for any professional. A few of your most frequent offenders might be coming to mind right now. You know who they are. They’re the people who never respond, always hit “reply all” or frequently fill your inbox with spam.  Simply put, they make communication far more complicated than it needs to be.

From my experience, I’ve identified 11 personalities of poor email etiquette. Some stem from ignorance while others stem from defiance. No matter the origin of the personality, they all produce a similar aggravation when it comes time to communicate with them. How many of these sound frustratingly familiar?

The black hole

You may as well be sending your message in to outer space. No matter how many times and ways you follow-up, you never receive a response. Ever. I mean, why even have an email account?

The never BCC

Blind-closed-copying (BCC) is a glorious tool that allows people to send a message to the masses, without disclosing everyone’s email address to each other. That is, until it is misused. Such as when you get included in a long email chain with people you don’t know – and don’t really want to have your email address. Which leads to…

The reply all

Inevitably the “never BCC” offender brings about the “reply all” guy who copies the entire email list on a response that is only relevant to the sender…or no one at all. Most of us know this disastrous scenario. The reply all email responses keep coming days, even weeks later and not one of them ever really relevant to anyone more than the sender (yeah, the “never BCC” guy).

The reply one

In selective instances where you actually want people to reply all, like when you’re trying to introduce two people or have them work together, one person only ever replies to you. This means you have to constantly forward to the rest of the group so that they’re aware of the response.

The forward with no explanation

This is the person who forwards a message to you with no additional details and it’s not overly apparent as to what’s expected of you. Do you need to respond? Is this just FYI? Forwarding an email takes no effort, at least grant us with a small explanation so we don’t have to send the passive aggressive response, “Is any action needed for this?”

The single word response

You’ll send a long email with various topics requiring some thought and explanation in return, yet this person finds it somehow sufficient to respond simply with “okay” or “yes.” After a while, you’ll try tactics like bolding, highlighting and underlining the exact questions you need answered in detail – but I promise you, even with all that effort, they’re only ever going to tell you that it’s “okay.”

The stream of conscious

These email messages tend to read like a terribly written monologue. They include every thought that pops into the person’s head during his time writing, sometimes even including strange and irrelevant details like what he ate for lunch or that he has to walk the dog tonight. You’ll wholeheartedly wish it was acceptable to respond with “Can you just boil this down into an executive summary for me?”

The spammer

This person clutters your inbox with non-work related emails, sharing those forwarded messages that contain corny jokes, awkward gifs and links to download a video you just “have to see to believe.” Not everyone thinks that video of a dancing cat is hilarious – or deserving of 5 minutes of your busy work day. If only the government would also mandate a required unsubscribe option for these people as well.

The hit and run

This is the person who, for a while, will answer your messages quickly and with enthusiasm. Then, he goes completely AWOL. What changed? What did I do? I get it. Everyone can get swamped with work for a few days or be out traveling. Still, such a drastic 180 in email communication is as hard to rationalize as it is annoying.

The last word

This person always has to have the last word, even when a response is completely unnecessary. Say, for example, you send an email to coordinate a time to meet. Once you decide on a place and time, it’s perfectly acceptable to close the conversation there. Instead “the last word” guy will always shoot back a final email to whatever you say even if it’s merely repeating your exact message. If you have the time and patience, you could really have some fun just to see how many of the same responses you can get from “the last word” guy.

The selective responder

This email personality is most frustrating when you have several important questions for which you need answers. You clearly outline each one (maybe even with numbers or bullet points), yet “the selective responder” will reply with only a fraction of the requested information, offering no acknowledgement of or explanation for the outstanding questions that remain. Inevitably, you reply again (and again) with a narrowed down list of questions until you get all your answers. You may as well be a dentist pulling teeth.

The better late than never

Finally, there’s this wild card. The “better late than never” guy will finally respond to an email you sent months ago without acknowledging the fact half a year has gone by or offering an explanation as to why it took so long. Even odder, this email personality doesn’t seem to realize that his response has little to no value now as you’ve had to move on and find your information elsewhere.

What type of annoying email personalities do you most often encounter? Do you have some more that should be added to this list? Share your thoughts by commenting below!

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Virtual Work Environment: When it simply doesn’t work

virtual work environmentAs a consultant, I strive to run a lean business. I work from home and meet clients on location to eliminate the overhead of an outside office. I delegate work to additional contractors rather than taking on full time employees. And because I require merely an internet connection and laptop, I can and have worked from almost every location I’ve ever been in. The virtual work environment has suited me very well. My clients have also experienced the benefits through my pricing and availability. But as fun and flexible as working from home can be, I acknowledge that it simply doesn’t fit every situation.

Different personality types are better suited for the “home working” experience and depending upon the job description, a business may need an in-office employee to meet various needs. I’m a full subscriber to the virtual work environment, as it lends itself to my particular services very well. But before you start setting up your own home office, take into consideration these following work situations that shouldn’t go virtual.

When you need immediate responses.

I make the commitment to my clients that they will receive a response or acknowledgement of their message within one business day – often much sooner. In comparison to most email communications, this is quite a quick response time; however, it’s still not as quick as if I were sitting at a desk next to you. In-office employees allow for almost instant communication because you have the benefit of popping your head over a cubicle or hunting them down in the break room. If the job description requires immediate responses, a virtual position could substantially decrease efficiency.

When you thrive on social interaction.

This is when working from home may have nothing to do with the job, but everything to do with the person. I thrive on a quiet, uninterrupted work environment. I used to HATE having people drop-in just to chat or getting pulled into an impromptu meeting. I worked much less efficiently because of these distractions. But I’m an introvert. For others, these are not “distractions” but are part of the company culture that makes them feel like a team. They thrive on social interaction and pull their energy and inspiration from those around them. If you took this away, work would suffer.

When you don’t trust your teammates.

Trust influences how well tasks are accomplished when employees aren’t working face-to-face. When working virtually, you don’t have the benefit of building relationships as quickly as you do in a traditional office. It takes a lot longer to build up the feelings of trust and accountability toward someone you don’t see day to day. Distrust can also come from not knowing if someone is doing the work they need to be doing. It’s easy to assume your co-worker is snoozing on the couch at home while you’re slaving away on a project if you don’t trust them or have the ability to check-in on them as you do in a traditional office.

When you’re needed to serve various, undefined roles.

The final work situation that does not lend itself well to a virtual position is one in which you are the Jack of all trades. Think of an office assistant. Their job description might outline the role of answering phones, entering data and scheduling appointments. But in reality, they are likely asked to take on many additional projects to help around the office since they are there and available. In an office where it’s all hands on deck, virtual employees benefit from being “out of sight, out of mind” and are not utilized to their fullest. This leaves the in-office employees to pick up the slack.

Even though we just covered four situations that are not best suited for the virtual work environment, don’t get me wrong. There are still many, well-documented benefits. Studies show that home workers are more productive, happier in their jobs and less likely to leave than their office-bound peers.  Virtual working also saves money, is better for the environment and gives staff the flexibility that many people crave. But it’s equally important to note that “home working” simply doesn’t fit every situation. Technology can connect us from sea to sea, but it can’t completely replace the need for in-office employees.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

7 Tips for Gaining Media Recognition for Your Business (Guest Blog by Queen Chioma Nworgu)

The following guest post comes to us all the way from the UK! Queen Chioma Nworgu is an international motivational speaker, success coach and a TV Presenter that resides in London. Enjoy her following insights and be sure to visit her bio below to connect with her on social media!

————————————————————————————————

Interview time7 Tips for Gaining Media Recognition for Your Business

To be fully recognized and honored in the media for what you do in your business is nearly every entrepreneurs dream. Foremost, this will help attract new clients – but we can’t overlook the added bonus of impressing your friends and family at the same time!

Some businesses and entrepreneurs make gaining media exposure look easy, but really it’s quite strategic and takes time. If you’re seeking the limelight and are ready to start featuring your business or personal accomplishments in magazines, newspapers and on TV, here are seven key tips that will help you get started!

1. Make appearances at exclusive events

One of the best ways to break into the media world and gain media recognition for your business is to attend exclusive events. The types of events that you should attend to gain publicity are seminars, exhibitions, meetings, conferences, award shows and networking events.

This is where you will often find the media. Journalists, reporters, videographers and photographers are always attending exclusive events and looking for amazing CEO’s, entrepreneurs and successful people to interview and feature in their publications, blogs or TV shows. They are hunting for the next big story.  It is your job to introduce yourself to them and intrigue them your entrepreneurial journey. Ask them if they would be interested in interviewing you. It seems common sense, but so many people fail to take advantage of this opportunity!

2. Dress to Impress

Make sure the image you’re portraying reflects someone that the media would want to talk to. This means dressing like a professional whether you’re at an event or working from home. If you look like an executive who’s in charge, your actions will reflect this.

Dressing for success will dramatically increase your confidence and charisma. You will speak with more authority when you make those media calls or introduce yourself. You will also stand out at events and leave a lasting, positive impression.

The media is attracted to people with high levels of charisma. They are always looking for people that will enhance their publications. Bright colors and glamorous outfits demand attention. By no means do you have to be the most attractive person in the room; your professional attire will be what helps to give you an edge.

3. Send Press Releases

Create a quality press release and send it out to key contacts within the media who would be interested in covering your specific topic. Do your research to develop a targeted media list and foster meaningful relationships with these contacts. Reach out to local newspapers, blogs, websites and shows that you would like to be featured on. In your press release, be sure to include articles, tear sheets and publications/shows that have featured you previously. You should also provide the media with a succinct list highlighting your professional achievements.

4. Win a Business Award

The media is always looking for award winners to be featured in their publications. If you have not yet won an award, why not make this your new ambition? It’s a great boost for your business and your personal brand as well.

I encourage you to apply for several business awards in 2014. Be sure to highlight the most important qualities that will increase your chances of winning which include professionalism, excellent customer service, hard work and dedication. Every award is different, so be sure to tailor your submissions appropriately!

5. Start your own web TV show

One of the best ways to attract media publicity to your business is to host your own Internet TV show. There are many simply ways to do this, so don’t be intimidated! You can create daily v-logs, a weekly show or upload videos once a week or twice a month – whatever suits you! This is a great way to build an organic audience and create a buzz about your business that will gain media attention. Once you get going, it won’t be long before you receive requests from the media asking you to be a part of their show, magazine, blog or website.

6. Be inspired

Another strategic way to break into the media is to study entrepreneurs and celebrities that receive a lot of coverage. Read their biographies and success stories. Learn from what they’ve done and write out key points on what these people did throughout their journey toward success.

Ask yourself, how can I improve my services, products and character to start gaining this same media recognition? What are they doing to get publicity? Who do I know that can connect me to interviews or features in the media? Be prepared to do what successful people do (while maintaining integrity of course) even if this means long hours and hard work. Success takes effort!

7. Become an expert in your field

Finally, one of the best ways to gain media exposure is to become an expert in your field. The media is always looking for experts to come on to their shows or to discuss important issues on the news, in blogs, newspapers and at events. Learn all you can about your industry, read books, keep tabs on the daily news and join educational or networking groups that discuss related topics. Once you position yourself as an expert, reach out to the media and offer your insight and expert advice on topics they’re currently covering.

Gaining media exposure for your business is no easy task. If it was, we’d all have the press coverage we want for our accomplishments! Rather, it takes time, talent, strategy and above all else – patience to really build meaningful relationships with the media. Take the advice listed in these seven tips and you will be well on your way to increasing your media exposure.

Snipper Photography (C) 2013

Snipper Photography (C) 2013

About the Author: Queen Chioma Nworgu MA, BA (hons) is a TV appearing international motivational speaker, success coach and a TV Presenter that resides in London, UK. She speaks regularly at conferences, seminars, schools, colleges and universities giving strategies for success and motivation. She has had over 150 TV appearances on TV channels which include ITV, MTV, BBC 1 and Nollywood TV. She believes that you can achieve all of your dreams if you manage your time effectively and never give up.  Connect with Queen Chioma Nworgu by visiting her website, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Meeting Fate Halfway

blindfolded womanEvery so often life presents us with moments where things really feel like they’re coming together. We can choose to believe this is by chance or that this is by fate.  Switching careers, buying a new home and falling in love are all life changing experiences where so often we hear people say “It was fate.” I do believe in fate. I believe that doors close so others may open and I believe that our passions can lead us toward where we are meant to be. But I also believe that we must meet fate halfway.

In a recent conversation with a friend about my own endeavors as an entrepreneur, he said that I am fortunate to have had fate lead me down this path. My response was that although fate presented me with opportunities, it was still my responsibility to be prepared to seize them. This is important for every business owner to remember. Even if you believe in fate, this is not an excuse to walk around blind folded just waiting for it to lead you where you’re supposed to go. You must be an active participant in the process. Just a little more than two years ago, when I turned my part time passion into my full time career, fate presented me with the opportunity, but I still had to contribute the vision and the hard work to make it a sustainable success.

During this entrepreneurial journey, I’m learning that you can’t leave everything to chance. When I meet a potential client, I still have to prove my skills and professionalism to increase my chances of working with them. Fate may have placed me in the right place at the right time to be considered for this opportunity, but I most certainly won’t get the job if I sit back and do nothing.

I’ve also learned not to be foolishly optimistic. Fate is a presence in my life, but it’s not a safety net. Relying too heavily on fate to always give you your happy ending will result in many unhappy outcomes. Fate won’t pay my taxes, guarantee new clients or further develop my skills. It isn’t fate’s responsibility to do so. It’s mine. Fate has and continues to present me with the opportunities to accomplish these things successfully, but I must always meet fate halfway.

I think we must redefine our perception of fate. It’s fun and romantic to throw our cautions to the wind and say “whatever will be, will be,” but this is taking advantage of – and missing out on – the opportunities with which we’ve been presented. Instead, even with fate on our side, we must continue to keep our nose to grindstone and prepare ourselves to seize life’s fateful opportunities.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 927 other followers

%d bloggers like this: