RSS

The Necessary Slow Burn of Business Growth

06 May

priarie fireConsider this. Each spring it’s common practice to burn the tall grasses of the prairie. The reasons for this man made fire are those to benefit the prairie and it’s natural habitat – to remove old growth, put nutrients back into the soil and promote new growth and abundance. The prairie needs this fire to exist. As reckless and destructive as this once seemed to me as a child, I’ve come to understand and appreciate the prairie’s need for this slow, controlled burn. But now as an adult, reexamining this yearly ritual made me question another aspect of these prairie fires.

Why not just use gasoline, light a quick blaze and take care of the whole field at once? Why does it need to be a slow and smoldering fire – a process that seems to be so needlessly drawn out?

The answer to this question is actually quite strategic and far from needless. The slow, controlled burn of these tall prairie grasses is necessary for achieving all the ecological benefits that it does. Gasoline would absolutely ruin the soil and prevent these tall grasses from ever growing again. And a large wildfire would wreak havoc on other parts of the ecosystem (not to mention holds the potential to easily burn out of control). So why am I choosing to tell you so much about these prairie fires? It’s because I see an important lesson on life and business building within these flames – a lesson that speaks to both patience and strategy.

Letting it burn (slowly)

For anyone who has ever attempted to build a business, the process of growth is unpredictable and unstable at best. We want to believe, that like any model growth chart illustrates, our business will grow with dramatic spikes until we blast off the chart. But this is neither common nor sustainable for 99% of businesses out there. Instead, like a prairie fire, the healthiest and most lasting business growth is a steady smoldering that inches onward day by day. I define this as healthy growth because it’s growth that blazes a new trail while giving us enough time to stay right in tow. We control it; it does not control us. This is also the type of growth that strengthens a business as oppose to a wildfire which could burn it all down. Most importantly and much like the prairie fires, this slow, controlled burn weeds out the old while laying the rich foundation for future growth. It’s a change that moves at the pace of evolution, and it should be our goal to evolve patiently and strategically as such.

Avoiding the temptation to rush

With technology at our fingertips and our society of ever-connectedness, our accessibility to “gasoline” is endless. This causes a great temptation to rush the process of the slow burn just because we have the means to do so. But as ecologists have proven and stressed, this quick and fast method is not always beneficial, and sometimes harmful, depending upon what you’re trying to achieve. For the slow burn of business growth, you’re trying to achieve much more than a burnt and barren field. You want to preserve the ground and burn only what is necessary. Gasoline won’t allow you to do this. We have to avoid the temptation and let things progress on their own. Instead, we often want to ignite the fire with things like an overkill of paid advertising (this is often a waste of precious capital in the beginning) or gimmicky deals (this often pulls in the wrong client base). Such “shoot-from-the-hip” strategies may produce big flames for display, but at some point these flames will cause destruction or someone will get burned. As I’ve mentioned before, such growth is neither sustainable nor beneficial in the long run.

In life or in business, have you ever personally experienced the temptation to rush a critical process? Maybe this is a process of growth, a process of healing or a process of change. While it’s tempting to want to overcome these uncomfortable and even painful moments in life quickly, rushing the process can prevent us from receiving all of the benefits they’re meant to bring. Learn to appreciate the slow fires we have lit and know that they are with the purpose and intent to make us stronger and more abundant.

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

8 responses to “The Necessary Slow Burn of Business Growth

  1. Beate ( Bay-Ott-Tay)

    May 7, 2013 at 11:18 am

    Biblical principles ALAWYS work. Slow burning is biblical inspired and our ancestors read their Bibles. We don’t do that, hence we always are into instant, without foundation and have the tendency “burn” too much, make a mess and do not live beneficial. Thank you for pointing out this concept of basic business principle. I needed that encouragement, because even though this is my 14th business I am starting ( I get bored quickly), I forgot that part.

     
    • Stephanie Shirley

      May 9, 2013 at 7:42 am

      Thanks for this comment! I’m glad you found it relevant and helpful to your own businesses. It is indeed a good reminder to slow down.

       
  2. conexiion

    May 7, 2013 at 8:29 pm

    You make an excellent point about letting it burn “slowly” so that you can control business growth and not letting it control you. I think one of our biggest pitfalls as a society is gravitating to instant gratification; quick cash and quick growth. Time again and again shows us that “easy comes, easy goes” so let’s be very careful how we grow our business. Looking at your business holistically and going for organic growth can work wonders for long-term success, unless your business strategy is to grow quick and get out quick. It really depends on your business strategy. Great post!

     
    • Stephanie Shirley

      May 9, 2013 at 7:43 am

      Great point! It does to a degree depend upon your business strategies and even your own personality and values. For anyone looking to create a business that stands the test of time, the “slow burn” approach helps to develop the sustainable growth.

       
  3. devonsmiley

    May 26, 2013 at 9:05 pm

    Thanks for the post Stephanie! It’s sometimes tough to think of the slow growth as a positive thing, but stepping back and taking a look at it, I know that it’s for the best as it reduces stress (there are only so many hours in a day to work) and gives time to work out the bugs that arise. Almost like getting to perfect my stroke technique before jumping into the deep end with all the big kids!

    Devon

     
    • Stephanie Shirley

      June 9, 2013 at 10:17 am

      Thank you for sharing this perspective, Devon! That’s a really great analogy and so true. As much as entrepreneurship is about taking leaps, there also needs to be a method and strategy behind it. The slow burn of business growth allows for this.

       

Comments are encouraged!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: